Annual Results Report: Programme Year 5 (April 2016 - March 2017)

During Programme Year Five, from April 2016 to end March 2017, Samarth-NMDP has solidified its interventions and has been able to record some impressive results at all levels of the log frame. At the impact level, the programme has made significant progress since year 4, reporting a total of 183,463 beneficiaries to date, nearly doubling the programme results to date. One-fourth of the results reported to date come from the Crop Protection Inputs sector, and Pigs, Vegetables, and Fish sectors have all reached between 20-30,000 beneficiaries each.

Annual Results Report: Programme Year 4 (April 2015 - March 2016)

Based on the approved interventions across ten sectors, the programme expects to generate additional income among 365,200 beneficiaries with net additional income of £19,799,700 within March 2018. Out of this, 96,500 beneficiaries have already realized net additional income of £4,167,700 by March 2016. In total, nine interventions (refer to annex I) have contributed to achieve this. As per the logframe, the programme expects to increase net additional income of 300,000 beneficiaries by £24,000,000.

A STUDY ON THE ROLE OF WOMEN IN THE PIG SECTOR IN KAILALI & DHANKUTA DISTRICTS, NEPAL

The pig sector in Nepal is widespread and mainly characterized by small-scale, mixed farms. Pig farming is dominated by small household (HH) production units of 1-2 pigs, which accounted for 86% (464,200 HH) of all households raising pigs in 2011. Production is typically low-input low-output, using unimproved breeds. The most common sources of pig feed are food industry by-products, kitchen waste, and grain by-products. Pigs therefore serve to convert limited waste and by-products of low value into high value food for consumption or/and sale.

Samarth-NMDP Gender Equality and Social Inclusion ( GESI) strategy

In Nepal, 55% of the population still lives on less than $1.25 per day, and 78% on less than $2 a day: gender and social exclusion have been found to be drivers of poverty3. Inequalities have also increased with a rise in the Gini coefficient (from 0.34 to 0.41 between 1995 and 2004), and it is clear that poverty continues to affect social groups to differing degrees. A recent report on gender disparities concluded that Nepal is one is the least equal countries in the world – ranking 115th out of 1344.

Annual Results Report : Programme Year Two (May 2013 – April 2014)

During Programme Year Two, beginning May 2013 to end April 2014, Samarth-NMDP has laid strong foundations for sustainable change across a range of agricultural markets, as well as recording the first signs of impact at the farm-level. Overall, working across eight rural sectors, evidence of progress towards systemic change has been recorded in five market systems, where Samarth-NMDP has successfully coaxed investment or change in how the private or public sector are doing business.

Stimulating the supply of ginger disease management products in Nepal

In the mid-hills of Nepal, ginger farming is one of the most significant sources of cash income for poor smallholders. The net incomes of farmers involved in ginger cultivation is significantly higher than that in competing crops, such as rice and fresh vegetables. However, over a third of Nepali ginger producers fall below the poverty line, many of whom face both geographic and social exclusion.One of the most significant constraints facing producers relates to disease management – an estimated 50% of ginger farmers in Nepal suffer from disease in their crops.

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